Changes

If you’re a regular reader of my blog, you may have noticed a lack of updates recently.

That’s for two reasons: I’ve been overall busier lately and I haven’t really had any ideas worth creating a blog post or inspiration pushing me to create.

So I haven’t been reading as much, which is why there hasn’t been a Lightning Round in a couple months.

This lack of inspiration is probably temporary, but how temporary I don’t know. I ran the well dry, but it will refill at some point. When I have something I want to write about, I’ll post it up here, so there should still be the occasional posts, but not as many as I’ve been putting out. At some point, I’ll probably pick up blogging seriously again, and I’ll pick it up here when I do.

If you want to read my more minor thoughts, I do tweet regularly here: so feel free to follow. It’s also probably the best way to contact me.

I haven’t checked my e-mail for a long while, so if you’ve e-mailed me, than you have my sincere apologies for my lack pf response. I probably won’t be responding. to any I’ve received, my apologies again.

Finally, check out Counter-Fund. Support them. Building an alternative infrastructure for the right is probably the most important political task we have.

When I start writing seriously again, I’ll probably become an influencer there. If/when I do, hopefully you’ll support me. If you do, then I’ll force myself to read, think of things to write for you, and respond to inquiries promptly.

 

Lightning Round – 2017/04/12

Constitutionalism is a myth.

Ethnonationalism and aristocladism.

Basic strategic concepts.

The rise of the reactionary: 1, 2, 3.

Against realism.

The inglorious revolution.

Political freedom and the banality singularity.
Related: Show liberals know mercy.
Related: Non theories begat non sense.

The long romance of socialism and liberal democracy.

The Northern Dawn Symposium.

The WASP question.

Meet the beadles.

But mostly cars.

The Pentagon is making the CIA and State obsolete.

Sociobiology as the Freudianism of the right.

The SFSU strikes. Part 2.

Single white women are the undertow of legacy Americans.
Related: How menopausal women lead to Islam.

White privilege vs. white death.

Allying with far to destroy near.

The coordinated hit on hate.

Ignorance is strength.

Trump already remakes the world.
Related: Not a nation of immigrants.
Related: Montezuma’s corollary.

The border-adjustment tax.
Related: A classic upside-down NYT article on corn and NAFTA.

The likely shape of a Trump autocoup.

Syrian gas attack persuasion.
Related: Neoconning Trump.

Trump: 4d chess master or puppet?
Related: Syria and the next target.
Related: Possible joint Chinese-US offensive against North Korea.
Related: On Trump’s Syria strike blunder.
Related: Scott Adams on the strike.
Related: Syria: what we know.
Related: Trump: the master or the cuckold?
Related: Mark was wrong on Trump.
Related: It’s looking grim.
Related: The victory of the Cathedral.
My opinion: Wait and see. Trump has earned a measure of benefit of the doubt.

Copts murdered in Egypt.

Trump spied on by Obama administration.

The alt-lite’s fatal flaw.

The fantastic health care failure.
Related: Prioritize.

The ideological cult of the SJW.

Brexit begins.

On usury.

No patriarchy without patriarchs.
Related: Manliness is authority. And femininity is desire.

Men and women’s fates are bound.

Cuck nation.

Another victim of family courts.

The sexbot and robot revolutions.

Manufacturing the college rape scare.

On nazi art.

The Venezuelan judicial coup.

California criminalized undercover reporting, by conservatives.

Leftist mom enjoys tolerance.

The lizard people.

Modern science is non-science.
Related: Where anthropology went wrong.

On socialization.

Chesterton on AI Risk.

When both Taibbi and Chomsky think you’re nuts regarding Russia.

The #BLM Stanford kid.

The failure of Marvel’s progressive agenda.

On the Pepsi ad.

Crippling the Priesthood

Here is another, long term strategy for the Trumpenkrieg.

The right has two main enemies: the press and academia, together with the bureaucracy they form what we call the Cathedral. Academia creates liberal doctrine and indoctrinates the young into it. The press promulgates doctrine. The bureaucracy implements it. The bureaucracy, while a problem, follows the lead of the press and the academy.

The press is immolating itself. It is being outflanked by non-traditional media enabled by modern technologies and is squandering what’s left of its legitimacy rapidly. We should help it along its course, but its self-destruction is nigh inevitable. The main question is rebuilding something favourable to western civilization in its place.

On the other hand the academy is going strong and continually grows stronger. It’s primary strength is that a diploma is necessary for a “good” job. The destruction of the traditional economy is leaving many in a situation of Yale or jail. For ever-more Americans the choice is increasingly either college or destitution. So most young Americans choose to load themselves in debt for their anti-poverty paper.

I’ve stated before, we should end federal student loans, and I stand by that, but that is a minor measure that still leaves the system intact. Another measure to strike against the university is to end disparate impact. Sailer has been writing about how disparate impact prevents direct meritocratic hiring, forcing employers to rely on indirect signals, such as a degree, for years now. Ending disparate impact would alleviate some of the economic necessity of a college degree.

But, I’m going to present a strategy even more direct. One that would almost immediately cripple the academy’s stranglehold over meritocratic signalling. I will say beforehand, that this would require significant resources and extensive coordination. Ideally, this could function as a start-up if someone had enough access to VC and could get buy-in from at least one industry to start, but realistically, this would probably have to be a government project (so if any of you have a line to Bannon or someone else who might be interested, send this idea along; take credit if you want, the idea is simple and not particularly novel, its implementation would be the heavy work).

The idea is simply a Knowledge and Skills Signaling Organization or KASSO for short. Essentially, the KASSO would be a single window supplier of certifications for occupational knowledge and skills.

KASSO would work with various industrial and occupational organizations to develop a battery of certification tests, both academic and practical, for each industry/occupation, the completion of which would demonstrate a certain level of competence in the tested competency. Upon successful completion of certification tests, the testee would be given a certificate of competence, which would he could present to employers.

For an example of how this would work, let’s look at programming. Programming already has a large spread of certifications, but KASSO would centralize and standardize these certifications. It would start by consulting with major Silicon Valley firms and other firms with large programming departments, about what particular skills requirements they would require for their various programming occupations. It may also talk to other industry players, such as programming languages organizations, language developers, or conferences, but it would primarily be aimed at what the employers wanted.

Working with these groups, it would develop a series of tests that would show competence, in these. For example, you could have a C++ 1, C++ 2, and C++ 3 for basic C++ knowledge for grunt-work programmers, mid-level programmers, and expert programmers, respectively. Each test would be a rigourous, complete and supervised. The C++ 1 test could, for example, be a combination of developing a few simple programs or routines, doing some basic debugging, and answering some basic theoretical questions. While the C++ 3 certification could be developing a complex program from scratch and a difficult debugging problem based on a real-life example.

The length and involvement of these tests would depend on the requirements thereof. The C++ 1, may only be a 3-hour test, while the C++ 3, may be three 8-hour days or even a 24-hour marathon.

Upon successful completion of the C++ 1 test, the testee would then be provided with his C++ 1 certificate, which he could present to his employer who would know that this testee was qualified for C++ work and to what degree he was qualified. What competences and what level of competence each degree represented would be easily available and clearly explained on KASSO’ website.

Of course, adding more gradations of skills would also be a possibility. You could have, for example, C++ 1 – Standard, Silver and Gold, depending on the level of competency shown.

Cheating would be possibility, so the strictest anti-cheating measures would be put in place to ensure the integrity of the process. Each testing class would be kept small, say a half-dozen testees. Each test would be monitored by two KASSO testers at all times. To prevent memorization, each test would actually be one of a half-dozen similar and equally challenging, but different, tests administered in a quasi-random order. There would also be a cool-down period for unsuccessful testees; say 4 months before they could attempt the test again. Insofar as possible, the tests would be as practical as possible so that cheating required as much competence in the subject matter as successful completion.

KASSO would pay for itself, or even be a for-profit organization. If each student had to pay, say $500 per a test, they could take a half-dozen different certifications for a fraction of a years worth of tuition, yet KASSO would still be raking in cash. Or, more likely, different tests would have different costs: C++ 1 may only cost $100, while C++ 3 may cost $2000. For those taking multiple related certification, there could be a discount program. Say, $5000 for testing in C++ 3, VB 3, and Java 3.

This same thing would be done for each in-demand language. There might be a set of certifications for those showing competence in language independent parts of programming. Whatever industry expresses a desire for. There might be a broader Programmer certification for those who’ve been certified in a certain range of programming languages and theory.

For each skill domain, industry, and/or occupational group there’d a similar set of tests and certifications, drawn from the needs of the various industries and organizations hiring people with those skills.

In addition, to such specialized certificates, such as programming, KASSO would offer more generalized certifications. A small battery of tests, similar to a GED, similar to a high school certification. Another, more larger and more difficult general test, that would be generally equivalent to the knowledge gained from a generalized humanities bachelor. A series of general tests could be equivalent to a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy, with a minor in Political Science. A series of tests could be the equivalent of a business degree. And so forth.

You could even apply tests to softer skills. Although, these tests may be harder to plan and implement, you could have certifications in salesmanship or public speaking.

These were all general examples, the details would have to be developed by experts, but the essential idea of KASSO is to create a self-funding organization providing a set of well-known, broadly-accepted, reliable certifications. Employers would know exactly what certified students had demonstrated competence in, while (future) employees would know which certifications would be needed to get the job they wanted.

There are a number of potential pitfalls. The main problem would be starting this up and getting buy-in from employers. Now, for the federal government a solution might be converting the useless education department to developing KASSO.

Another problem that would come from a government implementation of KASSO is political considerations intervening in what should be an impersonal and objective certification program. To combat this, the government should make it an independent, arms-length institution mostly outside the the ability for politicians or bureaucrats to interfere. Possibly even privatize it after it gets off the ground.

Anybody implementing KASSO may also have to be wary of disparate impact, but with enough will this could be worked around.

But beyond these pitfalls, KASSO would have numerous benefits. First, it would allow another route to competence signaling beyond college or even beyond high school. It would allow the self-taught, the self-motivated, and prodigies to receive certification without having to rely on formal schooling. It would reduce tuition debt slavery, as people could get certification relatively inexpensively through KASSO. It would reduce certification time as people taught themselves on their own schedule, so young people could enter the workforce earlier. Once heavily adopted, it would provide a standard set of certifications for human resources departments to look for and for (future) employees to pursue. It would help poor people lift themselves from poverty; they could get “better” jobs by studying on their own schedule and getting certifications. It would break the back of academia. It would prevent the waste of time and resources of dropouts, as it’s a lot easier to waste a day and $500 failing a test than a year and $10,000 failing your first year at university.

* All numbers and examples are rather arbitrary and undeveloped. They are there for illustrations sake; this is a broad outline, the experts would have to develop the real details.

Lightning Round – 2017/03/29

All freedom are exercises of discriminating authority.
Related: Passive exercises of authority aren’t.
Related: Objective freedom: the formless void.

King Henry’s rabbit hole.

The geopolitics of empire.

The wall is being built.
Related: No exit, no entry.

Tribal realism.

The mannerbund and coordination.

Tyler Cowen’s unexpected neoreactionary manifesto.

Integration’s who and whom.
Related: The inevitability of right-wing Europe.
Related: Be the CEO.
Related: On the fourth-turning.

The sin of Denethor. More.

Why the liberal media talks about the alt-right.
Related: The journalistic mind.

The whore enthroned.

Lessons from the Gulenist movement.
Related: Flynn’s Turkey work.

The CIA’s NSA.
Related: Valuing privacy.

Implementing patriarchy without the state.

World war meme.

Dispatches from the witch hunt.

Notes on Right-Petersonian Deviationism.
Related: On Peterson vs. Harris.
Related: Notes on propaganda.

Marx, nationalism, modernism, and fascism: Gregor (1, 2, 3, 4) and Griffin (1, 2).

The solution we do not want.
Related: Population vs. civilization replacement.
Related: “Have 5 children, not 3.”

Harrison Bergeron CRISPR Babies.

Demographic breakdowns of the election.
Related: An experiment of a sex-swapped presidential debate.

The decline and fall of a cavalier family.

Fake American.

Fixing healthcare.

Intolerable school funding.

Good leaders are rock star divas.
Related: Trust Trump.
Related: More Reagan than Reagan.

Winning by losing.

Trump was spied on.

Japan becoming capital.

Wilders’ Weimarish headwinds.

Species of exit: Israel.

Hope & Change.
Related: Beating up the Black Bloc.

On Hitler.

Seeing like a state.

The illegality of the courts.

Is racism an instinct?

Racism in education.

Waking from the fever dream.

Dougherty’s paleocon blues.

Defanging the dragon.

Romance and the red, blue, black, purple, and white pills.

The desire for the full Titanic experience.

On the Gen. 29 love story.

Fighting for his lady’s honour.

Feminism in a picture.

Female Author: Feminism is bad for most women.

The decline in married sex frequency.

Amazon pulls a Castilia House book. More.

People are gunning for Nick Land’s job.

The opposition media covers alt-tech.

Clinton’s office covered for a pedophile.

A theory falsified.

An Israeli Jew was behind the anti-semitic bomb threats.

Modern Ainu.

Lightning Round – 2017/03/03

There are no free societies.

Guilt is the SJW engine.

Another article on Moldbug and Urbit.

Jacobin, frogtwitter, and the new avante-garde.
Related: The left is ceding culture creation to the right.

Against dreams.

Defunding the left.
Related: Warmism and the old Mexican gods.
Related: Conservatives find their balls.

Denmark’s golden era of full employment.

Against CANZUK.

24-hour dissident radio.

Advice to the alt-right.

Civics 101 for the media.
Related: WaPo’s hypocrisy.

On balkanization.
Related: There is no us.

Trump bypasses the courts to deport them all.
Related: Laufman alleged to be the leaker.

Bannon: One of us?

Black Bloc cries.

Milo might have killed the pedo push.

Cucked CPAC.
Related: Schneider’s CPAC speech.

David Brooks: Pundit of the last men.

Bizarro Salon reveals RealNews.

CNN Leaks.

Cloud products, usury, and the death of property.

A god we must obey.
Related: NRO wants weddings, not marriages.
Related: Jim Geraghty on the beauty of the threatpoint.

Some relationship and marriage stats.

Alabama gets the state out of marriage.

How gammas help.

Trump goes to dinner.

Nick Land temporarily banned from Twitter.

On Cost Disease

SSC has written on cost disease. Essentially, a lot of important goods and services (health care, education, infrastructure, and housing) have increased by up to 10x their cost with no improvements in service for no discernible reason. He gave some though to it, and a number of others provided explanations.

The explanation that immediately sticks out of course is government over-regulation and over-involvement, as those industries listed are some of the more heavily regulated industries in the US. I’ve written of factors effecting housing costs a few times before.

I think those have a decent amount to do with it, but I think there are two fundamental problems that no one in those posts mentioned. They relate to two principles you’ve probably heard before: the Pareto principle and the iron law of bureaucracy.

****

Pareto Principle

The PP, also known as the 80/20 rule, is a basic rule of thumb essentially stating that 80% of the results come from 20% of the causes. Ex: 80% of the work is done by 20% of the workers. Following from this rule, you can also mathematically determine other rules. 20% of the 20% is going to cause 80% of the 80%; in other words, 64% of the outcome will come from 4% of the cause. This can then be extended to 51% of the outcome will be caused by 1%, and so on down the line. The rule’s not perfect and shouldn’t be taken as gospel, but it’s a nice rule of thumb.

In this particular case of cost disease, we’ll apply the PP to costs. By the PP, 20% of the population causes 80% of the costs. Or stated elsewise, the 20% uses 4x as much resources as the 80%.

So what happens when you add a new 20%?

For example, health care. I, like most people reading this, cost the health care system very little. I’ve been to the emergency room twice in in my adult life, and I go to a walk-in doctor about once every 2 years when I have a particularly vicious or inexplicable pain or cough. The 80% of the people like us can be treated relatively low cost; we get an occasional check-up and the rare emergency.

On the other hand, there are those with chronic illness or other conditions who use more health care in a month or two than I’ve used in the last decade. 20% of the people cost 80% of the health care resources. That’s not an indictment on the 20% (if I got hit by a bus on the way home today, I’d probably be in that 20%), but it’s undeniable that if us 80% simply stopped caring about the 20% and just let them suffer and die, health care costs would be 20% of what they are now.

Over time we’ve been going increasingly towards being able to treat more health problems and keep the nearly dead alive longer. Take AIDS: in the 80’s someone with AIDS was dead in a months. Now, he can be kept alive for decades using expensive drug cocktails.

So, let’s put some very rough numbers to it.* Let’s say 20% of that 20% (4%) used to just die quickly, because we couldn’t treat them. So, we have the 80%, the 16%, and the 4%. The 80% still can be treated; we cost stay the same. The 16% still use 4x the amount of resources the 80% use; a broken pelvis doesn’t treat itself. But now the 4% of AIDS patients and the like can be kept alive through expensive new technologies. This 4% is now 64% of the budget, which the budget has grown to accommodate. Keeping 4% people alive has well over doubled the costs of health care.

Now wait an unspecified amount of time for expensive new technologies and drugs that can treat a new 20% of the 4%who couldn’t previously be treated. Costs double again. Then another unspecified time later they double again and so on.

But that’s not including the new costs you impose. We 80% used to go to the ER once a decade and the doctor once a year, then die in our sleep from a heart attack at 70. But now, instead of dying at home in bed, new technologies and new detection we are able to detect and prevent that heart attack, so now we are heroically rescued by new medical technology, so we can die a decade or two later from a different age related condition. Then when our alloted time is over, instead of just giving up the ghost, we keep ourselves alive at great cost for a few extra months. We are now the 20%, maybe even the 4%.

This is not just hyperbole: 30% of Medicare spending goes to just 5% of people who will die within the year. 10% of Medicare goes to those people’s last month of life. Those extra few months are costly.

For education, we get the same thing. Look at this chart:

In 1973, 30% of people dropped out in high school. It’s safe to assume these are mostly the hardest and most expensive to educate 30%, they’re probably mostly handicapped, persistent trouble-makers, class clowns, generally stupid, or future ex-cons. In 2018, only 10% dropped out. So, rounding the PP off widely for ease, 70% of the students using 20% of the resources, 20% of the students using 80%, with 10% still dropped out. So you’ve added 20 percentage points of troublesome and costly students which have increased the amount of resources used by 4x.

The 10% left are the real costly troublemakers, these are the ones that are dumb as bricks, violent offenders, hate school with a passion, have hourly seizures, or whatever. So, if we start to include these very troublesome students, the will be the new 4%, and increase costs even more. The more stupid and disruptive the people we try to force to stay in school, and the longer we force them to stay there, the more costs per pupil inflate. If the education for everyone doesn’t stop, eventually, we’ll be spending half the education budget keeping 100 psychotic mass-murdering teenagers and low-functioning autists who enjoy biting teachers in a Supermax high school from killing each other and trying to learn their times tables.

College is no different. I’ve looked at the tuition bubble before, but let’s briefly go over it again. Look at that chart again: in 1973 only 28% of people had a degree, there were statistically no college dropouts. in 2018, 45% will have a degree and 17% will dropout. The college keeps adding new 20%’s. The 28% getting degrees in 1973 were, likely, the top 30% of the population in terms of intelligence and/or work ethic. They didn’t require much resources to teach themselves. Now 60% of people are going to college. People with below average intelligence and work ethic are having to be accommodated. A new 20% has been at least 3 times since 1973. Using the PP we can estimate costs would have risen by over 50x. Now, this is not entirely accurate, there are likely costs savings due to scale and at the most expensive of those waves mostly drops out, but you get the point.

Let’s look at infrastructure. Here’s a story I randomly saw from Toronto. Sidewalk spaces are being expanded to 2.1m at the costs of restaurant patios to accommodate the disabled. On the TV report I saw, they said it was because 2.1 meters allowed two motorized wheelchairs to pass each other. Again, the PP. It costs a lot for infrastructure to service the small fraction of people who are handicapped. It costs even more to service the rare event of two handicapped trying to pass each other at the same time (I can’t ever remember seeing two motorized wheelchairs at the same time in the wild). And one councilor is demanding even wider sidewalks for more accommodation. That’s a lot of extra cost for both the city for such a rare event.

Apply this one minor story more broadly. Beyond, the disabled, there’s the environmentalists, special interest groups, NIMBY, safety. You have to accommodate more and more people and more and more exceptions.

Now, almost everybody is and always has been housed, so PP doesn’t really apply there. Cost increases are more likely related to the factors I linked to earlier. You’ll also notice that housing costs did not grow at as high a pace as other costs in Scott’s post.

Over time these major services have gotten more inclusive. These new people being included cost significantly more resources than the people who were already included. By the 80/20 rule, ever new 20% we add quadruples costs. Every new 4% we add, almost doubles costs.

For the large majority of people, services haven’t improved at all, even though costs have skyrocketed, because these costs are being eaten by the inclusion of ever smaller but ever-more resource-consuming minorities.

****

Iron Law of Bureaucracy

One commenter linked to the following graph:

The ILB states that there are two types of people in every organization: the first is devoted to the organization’s goals, while the second is devoted to the organization itself. The second will always end up controlling the organization and it resources.

Look at the chart, it is clear the administrators control the organization and hiring and are hiring more of their own. It’s the ILB in action: the teachers directly contribute to the organizational goal of teaching, but the administrators are the one’s profiting themselves.

The ILB is what is a major part of cost disease. Over time any organization becomes more about expanding the organization than about completing its goals. The free market to some degree mitigates this, as organizations suffering too heavily under the iron law are forced to either reform or die out. But the organizations controlling education, health care, and infrastructure are not traditional free market organizations. They are either government organizations or heavily regulated, government-financed organizations.

Unless an organization dies or is forced to reform, it will inevitably become controlled by those devoted to enriching the organization and themselves, rather than to completing its goals.

Infrastructure provides a nice example. Look at the Big Inch pipeline built in 1944 and extending from Texas to New Jersey. At that time, government infrastructure programs were controlled by people dedicated to providing infrastructure. It took 3 years from planning to completion, because they wanted it up.

Comapre to the Keystone XL, controlled by our new iron-lawed infrastructure regulators dedicated to expanding their organization. It was proposed in 2008 and after 7 years in bureaucratic hell, was rejected by Obama. Then was allowed to start again under Trump a couple weeks ago. It has become more about increasing the power of hanger-on organizations than actually getting things done. Placating environmentalists, native activists, NIMBYists, labour organizations, etc. and making sure each gets their turn at looting is more important than actually creating infrastructure.

I don’t really think I have to explain this too deeply, anyone who’s ever worked in a large organization can easily see there is a small minority of people actually physically accomplishing the organization’s goals, then there are hoards of people having meetings, making mission statements, discussing work-life balance, running committees, making HR rules, doing busywork, playing corporate politics, doing pointless revisions to act like their contributing, and otherwise not actually accomplishing anything real, or sometimes even actively preventing the accomplishment of goals.

As people dedicated to expanding the organizations (and their own personal power bases) become more powerful, it becomes more costly to do the same amount of work. All those extra people don’t pay themselves.

****

* I know there’s mathematical and logical flaws and over-simplifications throughout these examples, but they’re just quick calculations for illustrative purposes. I’m dealing with a rule of thumb, not a mathematically precise model. Don’t get lost in the numbers, get the general jist of the message.

Lightning Round – 2017/02/21

A guide to reactionary political theory.

Politics is war.
Related: The conservation of group conflict.

Punching Nazis.
Related: Everyone is fair game.
Related: SJW’s double-down on promoting violence.
Related: Beatings are not hateful.
Related: Kicking the hornet’s nest.
Related: BLM: White people are sub-human.

Carlyle considered.

Efficient political order.

Cost disease. (I have a post on the topic coming this week).
Related: Jim on cost disease and Spandrell.
Related: More on cost disease.

Why people go to class.

On virtue signalling.

Asceticism of the wagecuck.

Northern Reaction: the book.

Infogalactic news.

“Boldmug” reappears briefly in the comments.

Bannonphobes.

Politico on Bannon, Taleb, Moldbug, and Decius.
Related: Moldbug trolls the Atlantic.
Related: Moldbug is secretly manipulating the Trump administration. Or not.
Related: Bannon cites Evola.

The petro-dollar and its consequences.

Measures of meaning.
Related: Deep identity in the American wasteland.

Race: The social construction of biological reality: parts 1, 2, & 3.
Related: The genetics of the American nations.

False dogmas and founding myths.

The longing for communism.

America’s colour revolutionaries.
Related: Entropic hysteria.

On stopping singularities.

Behaviourism in context.

Reactionary ideas in SF.

When Romans accepted refugees.

Immigration flash-point.

The psychological benefits of protectionism.
Related: Kristol wants to replace lazy whites with foreigners.

Immigration, gentrification, and segregation.
Related: It’s not a driver.
Related: You’ll never guess how this farmed solved it’s labour problem!
Related: A landlord’s account.

Chronicles of the kritarchy.

Calculating the cost of diversity.

Never look a gay Mexican in the mouth.

#CalExit narrative pushing.

Why are people poor?

Designing a Christian welfare system.

How Trump should tax the rich.

Notes from the gulag state.

Berkeley’s anti-free speech riots.
Related: Become un-plea-bargainable.
Related: 92% of left-wing activists live with their parents; 1/3 are unemployed.

No deferred action for childhood arrivals.
Related: Children being protected from deportation.

Labour mobility destroying nations.

The first confrontation between Trump and the permanent government.
Related: King of the Cascades.

After the Flight 93 election.

Trump derangement syndrome and status.

Trump reveals reality.

The winning will continue.
Related: 3rd generation politics.
Related: Trump warns the CIA.
Related: Drain the swamp.
Related: Trump saves Lena Dunham’s life.

Dumping Flynn looks weak, but he was expendable.
Related: Flynn as a cave by Trump?

Leftists are tools of the deep state.

Trump’s health care plan.

Trump’s wins are not the #NeverTrumpers’.
Related: #NeverTrump lies.

Someone at Harvard Review seem to actually get the white working class’ struggles.
Related: Our miserable 21st century.

Don’t resist the truth.
Related: Some social justice site wrote a surprisingly not grossly inaccurate history of the alt-right.

The alt-right, dissident right, and multi-culturalism.

Prologue.
Related: Israel, Russia, the CIA, and pedogate.
Related: The UK Prime Pedophile.

UK millennial men earning like women.

Dunbar feminism.
Related: Penis envy.

The Duluth model works.
Related: Defending Duluth.

Weak men screwing up the sexual revolution.

Denying feminist rebellion.

More on shotgun dads.
Related: Scaring bad boys and more.

Focus on the Family culls an SJW.

Study: Hillary received 800,000 votes from non-citizens.

The opposition media is fake news.
Related: CNN’s reaction to being called fake news.

The three kings.

Jerusalem Post on fake Jews.

The censorship of Roissy.
Related: Twitter’s enemies list.

SJW’s have no loyalty.
Related: Wil Wheaton being eaten.

The submission of Ross Douthat.

Dreher’s cucking intensifies.

Russell Moore is a Soros tool.

PewDiePie dropped; build your own platforms.

Operation destroy Milo. He resigns.

Normalizing degeneracy.

On Eichmann in Jerusalem.